Leland Vall
Certified Instructor
Alexander Technique in New York City
Manhattan - Downtown and Midtown
Great Neck - Middle Neck Rd
leland@freeyourneck.com
917-239-6313

Alexander
Technique

A Tool For Transformation
Sitting Posture - Alexander Technique

Leland Vall
Certified Instructor
Alexander Technique in New York City
Manhattan - Multiple Locations
Great Neck - Middle Neck Rd
leland@freeyourneck.com
917-239-6313

Alexander
Technique

A Tool For Transformation
Sitting Posture - Alexander Technique

A Troubadour’s Tension, Demystified: Shedding Studential Vanity

By Travis McKeveny

A well-wrought first blog post, I had thought to myself. Formally sound — free of grammatical errors and awkward constructions. Clearly articulated. Of an appropriate length. Where’s my A, teach?

Except, as Leland was kind enough to remind me after our last lesson, the point of my studying the Alexander Technique is not to write glowing testimonials for him or to appear knowledgeable re: the Technique or the terminology associated with it. It is to unlearn ways of using my body that are unnatural and tension-engendering. If this sounds vague, that’s okay — what I’m learning is not always amenable to concise description, and besides, I’m not an expert, but a beginner.

In other words, unsure, tentative — one who would be wise to surrender to the discomfort inherent in learning a skill. With that in mind, here are some questions that the last couple of lessons have raised — not questions to which I have found an answer.

How can I remember to lead with the top of my head while preparing to stand up from a seated position without tilting my head forward?

How can I learn to leave my neck alone while I’m on the table? And how, if I manage to relax enough to not interfere with my in and out breaths while on the table, can I still be attentive?

How can I walk in a manner not reminiscent of Frankenstein’s Monster, as immortalized by Boris Karloff? I fear that, while trying to put a swing in my step, I appear laughably uncoordinated.

What’s with the tightness in my left hip joint when I lift the left knee in the air while standing on my right leg?

Once I manage, during the work on the table, to breathe in a natural and fluid manner, how might I successfully do the same while singing and playing (again, the thought of circus plate-spinners comes to mind)?

How can I apply what I’ve learned to each everyday movement — e.g., texting, typing, conversing with a friend, etc. Do I have enough native kinesthetic intelligence to even do that?

And others.

I write these things in the hope that revealing my lack of certainly will help me to surrender to the learning process — a necessarily disorienting one.

 

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Long Term Changes – Notes on My Alexander Technique Lessons

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A Troubadour’s Tension, Demystified: Walking the Walk

1 Comment

  1. Great questions. I’m 68, also a singer with instrument around the neck and shoulder, sometimes standing, sometimes sitting. Been practicing Alexander for only a few years, but taichi for many years. For me they work together nicely. Unfortunately, or fortunately, pain from misuse has been my teacher. So I don’t dare forget now to lead with the top of my head and especially to lengthen the spine.

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